FAQ

  • Why should I join RLI?

    Membership provides the opportunity to help steer the mission and vision of the initiative, while coordinating a harmonized, cross-industry approach to address the root causes of forced labor. In addition, specific services and tools are provided to members to assist in establishing company-level due diligence programs, including:

    • Sensing, Advocacy and Communications Services
    • World-Class Standards and Compliance Checklists
    • Supply Chain Risk Assessments
    • Self-Assessments and Audits for Factories and Labor Agents
    • Factory Capability-Building, Supported by a Third-Party Helpline
    • Labor Agency Development and an “On-Ramp” to Certification Systems
    • Recruitment Corridor Data and Research
    • E-Learning Academy with topics such as understanding, recognizing and preventing forced labor, introduction to human rights, recruitment process, worker engagement, ethical recruitment and conducting due diligence on recruitment fees in the supply chain.
  • Is there an RLI membership fee?

    There is an annual membership fee of US$7,500 or US$15,000 depending on the company’s annual revenue (˂ or ˃ US$9B). RBA members are automatically members of the RLI and do not have to pay additional dues.

  • Can any company become an RLI member?

    RLI membership is open to any company (1) that supports the RLI vision and mission, (2) whose primary objective of joining the initiative is the implementation of forced labor due diligence in their supply chain, and (3)  produces or contracts the production of goods sold in local or international markets.

  • Can a recruitment agency/labor provider be an RLI member?

    No, currently there is no member category for recruitment agencies or labor agencies. However, these organizations may participate in the Responsible Recruitment Program (RRP)

  • What is the difference between an RBA and RLI member?

    RBA membership is open to companies that manufacture or contract the manufacture of electronic goods or a product in which electronics are essential to the primary functionality of the product, or supply materials used in the electronics of those goods. In recent years, the RBA has seen its membership expand beyond traditional electronics companies – into automotive and toy industries, for example – due to the prevalence of electronics in these products. RBA members enjoy a rich community of practice as well as tools, programs and other services that support the entire RBA Code of Conduct. The benefits and requirements of becoming an RBA member can be found here.

    RLI membership is open to any company (1) that supports the RLI vision and mission, (2) whose primary objective of joining the initiative is the implementation of forced labor due diligence in their supply chain, and (3)  produces or contracts the production of goods sold in local or international markets. RBA Member companies are automatically RLI members and join those companies that join the RLI exclusively to collectively drive due diligence on forced labor.

     

  • What is forced labor due diligence?

    Based on the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s guidance, due diligence is an ongoing, proactive and reactive process through which companies can identify, prevent, mitigate and account for how they address their actual and potential adverse impacts of forced labor as an integral part of business decision-making and risk management systems.